Is coronavirus treatment fair? Not in an unequal society

By Alexis Paton, April 2021

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Photo by Artem Podrez on Pexels.com

An important notion underlying most clinical and ethical pandemic guidance worldwide is the concept of fairness; whether this is the question of how to make decisions to allocate limited health resources or the need for ethical guidance on how healthcare staff should make difficult decisions about care to ensure that regulations are standardised around the country.

But when it comes to health, “fair” is a misnomer. This is because the principle of fairness relies on the premise that good health is available to everyone equally, when we know it is not.

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What are you doing here? Sexual and reproductive healthcare for people with disabilities

By Xanthe Hunt, Leslie Swartz, Mark Carew, and Poul Rohleder, April 2021

Few people relish the prospect of using sexual and reprodutive health services. Such encounters can be a bit awkward at best and – at worst – uncomfortable enough to discourage anyone from doing what’s needed to maintain their health and wellbeing. Buying condoms, asking a doctor about contraceptive options, having infections checked out, discussing bleeding or not bleeding, erections or their absence, are difficult for most people.

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